Thursday, 12 August 2010

The Semantics of House Price Innocence


Brain scan identifies adult autism – not having one of them then. Not having one of them then. Not having one of them then. Not having one of them then. Not having one of them then. Not having one of them then. Not having one of them then. Oh bugger – need to lock myself away in a cupboard and stack something.

Archaeologists have unearthed Britain’s oldest house. Apparently it dates from 8,500BC, which means that at the standard house price inflation it must be worth the UK’s annual GDP – mind you, it will be falling in price now, which will be a blow for the owners.

That Sion Jenkins, who after a retrial was pronounced not guilty of murdering his step daughter, has been turned down for compensation. As I understand it, the presumption in English law is that one is innocent until proven guilty. Jenkins – albeit after a retrial – was found to be not guilty, which in my universe means the presumption of innocence stands, regardless of any suspicions.

A spokesman for the Ministry of Justice said: "The Court of Appeal has made clear that, in the court's view, the right test to adopt in deciding whether someone is entitled to compensation is whether they have been shown to be clearly innocent." Am I missing something?


1 comment:

  1. Being in Scarborough it is amazing that house hasn't fallen off the edge of the cliff. Most houses built in the 1900s have. What with all the coastal erosion it is undoubtedly moving - which makes it Britain's' oldest caravan.

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