Friday, 12 February 2010

Sorry


Sorry for the hiatus, but I’ve been rather busy and one of my staff has resigned. Good for him that he’s moving on, but with a headcount freeze it means a lot more work for those remaining to man the barricades. I now have to achieve 10% more with 25% fewer resources. Simple sums says it ain’t going to happen.

Talking of apologising, John Healey, the UK Housing Minister, is being castigated by the Conservatives and the media for having the temerity to tell a self-evident truth during a radio interview.

He was talking about home repossessions and said: “Sometimes it is impossible for people to maintain the mortgage commitments they've got ... house repossession may be the best thing in those circumstances.”

He’s 200% spot on. Would you rather cut your losses and pass the debt to the bank, or struggle to service a debt that will only take you further into perdition and penury? Lose your albatross and at least you can rent somewhere for much less.

The Conservative shadow minister turned on the crocodile tears and suggested he apologise to those having their houses repossessed. Would a Conservative government help prop up unsustainable debt? I think not. Gross hypocrisy if you ask me. It’s kind of helped me make up my mind as to where my vote is going.

“Minister – are you going to apologise?”

“No.”

“Then will you apologise for not apologising?”

“No.”

“Will you resign for not apologising for not apologising?”

“No.”

“The will you apologise for not resigning?”

“No.”

Bloody arseholes! Harrumph.

Got a customer visit in Cornwall today, so we're going to stay there for the weekend with the Caravans – it’s Caravan’s birthday on the 14th, as well as Valentine’s Day. Yet another excuse for card manufacturers to scam us with their hideously priced wares.

It's 3am and I've been up for an hour and a half - Railtrack (or whatever it's called now) has decided that the early hours are ideal for doing some work on the tracks and using jack hammers.

Here's a question for you to ponder; when you lose an object in a dream, why on waking are you convinced you've also lost it in reality, even though you know you were dereaming?


11 comments:

  1. I think that you're partly correct - but the best way is not to let the bank/mortgage company re-possess your house as there are all sorts of additional charges that they will make - besides destroying your credit rating. The best way is to sell your house yourself and pay off the outstanding mortgage that way. Either way though, if the price you, or the mortgage company gets for the house doesn't cover the value of the loan then you will find yourself in deep do-dos.

    Richard x x x

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  2. But no-one with an ounce of sense should find themselves in negative equity.

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  3. You are of course correct - but people do find themselves in negative equity and they then think that handing the keys back and walking away is the best thing to do - it isn't!

    Richard x x x

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  4. Chairman Bill says - in these days of ultra low interest rates the only real manner in which people get into difficulties is through losing their jobs, when having ANY debt is bad. In those circumstances a small debt is much better than a huge mortgage debt that stands no chance whatsoever of being serviced.

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  5. I dreamt the other day that Chairman B had lost his irascible tongue and started posting about cute kittens and bunny rabbits. But when I awoke he was moaning away just and as cantankerous as every (thank goodness)

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  6. Alan -- LOL. Nice to have CB back, isn't it. I've been reduced to scouring the Mommy blogs for something readable...

    On mortgages and repossessions -- it's my understanding that if people were asked to put a lot more into a deposit they would a.) be less vulnerable to negative equity problems and b.) give up when the going gets tough...

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  7. Sorry, I meant less likely to give up...

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  8. Bill, I quoted part of your previous post on http://theysayitsinthegenes.blogspot.com/ Linked of course. It's wonderful.

    AV

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  9. As far as repossessions go it's very hard for people to give up their home even when it makes most sense to rent. A home is more than just bricks and mortar.

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  10. Kerrie: Home is not even bricks and mortar - its's where one's loved ones are. To hang on to something one can no longer afford is nether prudent nor sensible; in fact it's foolhardy.

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  11. And that most recent horrifying family tragedy just goes to prove that bricks and mortar and expensive holidays and keeping up appearances shouldn't matter to us a jot in life... Keep on at it, Brave Chairman... Hope your Valentine's Day in Cornwall brings you a hint of sunshine to come. My best to bold Hay! x

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