Saturday, 6 March 2010

Keeping Your Distance


Overheard in The Dog:

The Chairman, Hay and the Chairman's mate, Phil, are in The Dog pub having dinner. Phil is recounting a trans Atlantic voyage towing some massive buoy in a tug.

Phil: "You wouldn't believe the distance across the Atlantic at 4 knots."

Chairman: "Yes, it's exactly the same distance at 20 knots."


17 comments:

  1. I hate to be picky but that's not true - the effects of weather will act over a longer time at 4 knots than at 20 knots - therefore total leeway will be greater - thus distance is greater!

    Richard x x x

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  2. Richard: Hate to be picky too, but while one may traverse more water, the distance over the ground from A to B will remain the same.

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  3. Certainly the absolute distance will remain the same - but that is not the distance a ship will steam - apart from weather and current one has to go round the lumpy bits - and the Master may well choose a different route at 4 knots to one at 20 knots - AND you were talking about ships steaming time and didn't mention absolute distance. So Yar Bo!

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  4. And of course the effect of strong tide, current and weather would be to physically move the ship away from her expected course line thus travelling a greater distance

    Richard x x x

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  5. Richard; It most certainly is the distance she will steam, it's the distance over the ground that will be logged in the logbook, not the distance through the water. Nah nah, na-naa-nah.

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  6. It;s further to China on a slow boat!

    Richard x x x

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  7. The distance over the ground would be greater due to leeway. If I'm 5 miles off course I don't pretend that I'm not for the logbook - that's 5 miles extra

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  8. Richard: If you're 5 miles off course, your satnav is knackered and your autopilot possibly needs attention. Can I sell you one of each?

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  9. Again you didn't tell me that there was a sat nav on this ship - is it directly connected to the auto-pilot and is the Master allowing it to be used in this mode.

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  10. Richard: Naturally - he's an Old Conway and the very model of a modern major general. Oh no, that's something different, ain't it?

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  11. I have a strong suspicion that an awful lot of OCs would be insisting on hand steering and use of sexton only.

    I have found that connecting auto-pilot and sat nav can be a little exciting if the sat nav decides that it needs to make a sudden correction just as you're passing lumpy bits or tankers. But useful for great circle courses.

    Perhaps a little something from Pinafore? "I'm poor little Buttercup" perhaps

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  12. Oh, for chrissakes, somebody buy these two a drink....

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  13. btw I didn't know you and Hay were into role reversals. Do you also swap clothes?

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  14. And for pity's sake, can't you do something about this crappy black background? It kills my eyes.....

    (said with full understanding that last week when I called another blogger's background 'black crap' she threw a fit, spat the dummy, went ballistic, and ended up writing "I am done with you" to me, though unfortunately not before she'd spasticated all over email. I just made that word up and I frikkin' love it.)

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  15. Richard: What would an OC be doing on a vessel with a church officer charged with the maintenance of the church buildings and/or the surrounding graveyard and ringing of the church bells?

    Braja: Now don't try to separate us. Collateral damage, and all that....

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  16. Well, I thought you were the Chairman. But you write "The Chairman Hay, and the Chairman's mate, Bill..."

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